Why We Wear New Clothes on Easter – A History of the Tradition From a Fashion School Perspective

Many of us can remember our parents dressing us up in new clothes every Easter so we could parade around the neighborhood in our finest. It was a fun tradition to look forward to (or avoid, as some fashion-phobic children were known to do), whether we went to church or not. But where did this tradition come from? A look through history shows that its origins are not what we might expect. And examining the custom from a fashion school point of view, we see how changing retailing patterns have altered its significance.

Origins in other cultures. Although we associate wearing new clothes in spring with the Easter holiday, the tradition dates back to ancient times. Pagan worshipers celebrated the vernal equinox with a festival in honor of Ostera, the Germanic Goddess of Spring, and believed that wearing new clothes brought good luck. The Iranian new year, celebrated on the first day of Spring, has traditions rooted in the ancient pre-Islamic past. These traditions include spring cleaning and wearing new clothes to signify renewal and optimism. Similarly, the Chinese have celebrated its spring festival, also known as Lunar New Year, by wearing new clothes. It symbolized not only new beginnings, but the idea that people have more than they possibly need.

Christian beginnings. In the early days of Christianity, newly baptized Christians wore white linen robes at Easter to symbolize rebirth and new life. But it was not until 300 A.D. that wearing new clothes became an official decree, as the Roman emperor Constantine declared that his court must wear the finest new clothing on Easter. Eventually, the tradition came to mark the end of Lent, when after wearing weeks of the same clothes, worshipers discarded the old frocks for new ones.

Superstitions. A 15th-century proverb from Poor Robin’s Almanack stated that if one’s clothes on Easter were not new, one would have bad luck: “At Easter let your clothes be new; Or else for sure you will it rue.” In the 16th Century during the Tudor reign, it was believed that unless a person wore new garments at Easter, moths would eat the old ones, and evil crows would nest around their homes.

Post Civil War. Easter traditions as we know it were not celebrated in America until after the Civil War. Before that time, Puritans and the Protestant churches saw no good purpose in religious celebrations. After the devastation of the war, however, the churches saw Easter as a source of hope for Americans. Easter was called “The Sunday of Joy,” and women traded the dark colors of mourning for the happier colors of spring.

The Easter Parade. In the 1870s, the tradition of the New York Easter Parade began, in which women decked out in their newest and most fashionable clothing walked between the beautiful gothic churches on Fifth Avenue. The parade became one of the premier events of fashion design, a precursor to New York Fashion Week, if you will. It was famous around the country, and people who were poor or from the middle class would watch the parade to witness the latest trends in fashion design. Soon, clothing retailers leveraged the parade’s popularity and used Easter as a promotional tool in selling their garments. By the turn of the century, the holiday was as important to retailers as Christmas is today.

The American Dream. By the middle of the 20th Century, dressing up for Easter had lost much of any religious significance it might have had, and instead symbolized American prosperity. A look at vintage clothing ads in a fashion school library shows that wearing new clothes on Easter was something every wholesome, All-American family was expected to do.

Attitudes today. Although many of us may still don new clothes on Easter, the tradition doesn’t feel as special, not because of any religious ambivalence, but because we buy and wear new clothes all the time. At one time in this country, middle class families shopped only one or two times a year at the local store or from a catalog. But in the last few decades, retailing options have boomed. There’s a Gap on every corner, and countless internet merchants allow us to shop 24/7. No wonder young people today hear the Irving Berlin song “Easter Parade” and have no idea what it means.

It’s interesting to see where the tradition of wearing new clothes on Easter began, and how it’s evolved through the years. Even with changing times, however, the custom will surely continue in some form. After all, fashionistas love a reason to shop.

Love Shopping for New Clothes and Shoes? Here Are Some Quick Fashion Tips

As Vera Wang famously said, “I want people to see the dress, but focus on the woman.” Fashion is just that – really. You should be able to wear the best and still stand out beyond the outfit. If you are a fashion diva who loves shopping, we have listed down a few tips below that may just come handy.

  1. Black is always in. To another famed designer Karl Lagerfeld – “One is never over-dressed or under-dressed with a Little Black Dress.” No matter what defines your personal style, you need to have at least a couple of LBDs in your closet. Go for a minimalistic little black dress, or opt for a gown that’s best reserved for a special red-carpet event – the choices are just too many.
  2. Shop for designer outfits online. If you are looking for unique designs ladies clothing, online designer stores are always the best. Many designers prefer having a virtual outlet, because that makes their designs and work more accessible for their clientele. Also, just because it is something unique and designed by the experts, it doesn’t have to be expensive, as some of the retail costs are done away with.
  3. Play with colors. Red, black, white and blue are eternal colors, but fashion is also about experimenting with new ideas. How about buying a gown in a shade of sunset orange? Or a pair of high Louboutin heels with a few studs? Block colors, prints and stripes – you can try new things in the way you like.
  4. Mix your heels. No, you don’t have to try hard in those pencil stilettos anymore. This is the age when you can wear block heels, platforms, kitten heels and wedges with almost anything. The idea is to have a versatile collection that allows you to try new looks, and yes, there are no rules anymore – just go with the flow, and if you need help, check for fashion looks online.
  5. Keep an eye on seasonal fashion. Every fashion week offers a bunch of trends, some of which are meant to break the norms. From the recent feminist tees to the sudden pop of gingham prints, the trends are change, and so should you. Don’t shy away from creating new trends, because what you see on the runway is a reflection of how designers see people.

Finally, follow the fashion magazines and online portals to know what’s trending. Stepping out of the comfort zone is important, especially when you want to reinvent some of your treasured outfits. Many designers also offer the choice of customizing outfits for their clients for affordable prices, so if it’s a special occasion, think beyond your regular brands. Style is more about how you see yourself, and with couture, you can only do better, because everything from the stitch to the fabric is handpicked and designed to match your personal statement. Start shopping, and if you have found a few ideas, don’t forget to take a shot – Because you are worth it!